Throwback Thursday - Portraits of Little Women

Thursday, April 21, 2016

 


Tomboy Jo March would rather die than spend time with wealthy, proper Aunt March. She'd much rather race against the boys at school or star in all the swashbuckling plays she writes. But when Aunt March offers to adopt one of the March sisters to help ease the family money problems, Jo decides to make the ultimate sacrifice. She'll tear herself away from her sisters and parents--the family she dearly loves--if it means they'll have a better life. She's determined to become the perfect lady. Now Jo has to convince her family that she's sincere about her decision by taking on a role that may be too difficult to act.


The first classic novel I ever read was Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. It was a gift from my aunt for my twelfth birthday, claiming she read it when she was my age. Intrigued, and a little intimidated, I cracked open the big book and, well, that was all she wrote.
 
While I had trouble deciphering some of the language when little, I’ve read the story many times over now and I still love it as much as I did when I was young. As an aspiring writer and avid reader myself, I always sympathized and liked Jo the most. But that didn’t mean that the other March sisters weren’t endearing, too. The whole tale was heartwarming and the book will always hold an honorable place on my bookshelf and in my heart.
 
Anyway, when I was younger and after having just finished the novel, I was perusing my local library and came across the Portraits of Little Women series, which are novellas basically about all four March sisters and other adventures that supposedly happened in their lifetime. I was skeptical, of course, seeing as it was an interpretation of the characters and the like from a completely different author, but my desire to dive back into Alcott’s world won over.
 
To be honest, if I read the stories now, I would probably find them overly childish, but it was never meant to be a great piece of literary work. It was geared for children, after all, but that didn’t mean that they weren’t fun to read. I enjoyed all eight of the books that were at my library and Pfeiffer has since published more in the series. They also had recipes and little crafts in the back that the reader could make and I remember making a homemade keepsake pouch that I sewed all by myself – to hold rocks for my slingshot. Haha.
 
All in all, this was a great set of stories for any child who was interested in classics but not yet ready to graduate to the full unabridged novels. Or those kids, like me, who had read the novels, but wanted to see a different take on the characters. If you loved Little Women as much as I did, you just might want to give it a look one day!

6 comments :

  1. I've never heard of the Portraits of Little Women series before...sounds cute! :)

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    1. It really isn't well known. It's one of those books that you likely would've never heard of unless you literally ran across it at the library like I did. It has it's flaws, but it's certainly nostalgic. <3

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  2. I still really want to read this one, I can't believe that I haven't yet. I love that your aunt introduced you tot he classics, that is just awesome!

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    1. Yeah, Little Women will always have a special place in my heart. All the other girls drool over Mr. Darcy and I'm over here like, "Isn't Laurie a doll?" XD I hope you like it when you get around to it!

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  3. I also felt more drawn to Jo than any of the sisters while reading this novel. I never had a chance to pick it up when I was a kid, but I'm sure I would have loved it. I like the sound of these novellas, they'd probably be a good choice for kids not yet old enough for the novel.

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    1. Jo's certainly a very likable character, given the times the novel is set in. I think that she's so different is what draws readers to her. These books definitely would be good for a younger reader!

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